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Dulles To Open New Passenger Security Screening Areas

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Passengers flying out of Washington Dulles International Airport next week could flow through security more quickly, as the Airport opens two new screening areas.

Construction workers scramble across scaffolding, as they put finishing touches on the main terminal's new mezzanine. Whereas passengers currently flood a single security area on the ticketing level, the mezzanine will house a checkpoint on either end of the building.

"It's less chaotic," says John Lenihan, security director for the Transportation Security Administration. "It helps us calm the experience down so we can facilitate that flow faster."

Lenihan says it will be 600-passengers-per-hour faster. The current checkpoint houses 20 lanes; the new areas will have a total of 24.

The screening areas open September 15th, at 4 a.m... this will be the first of several scheduled improvements at Dulles, including a new "Aerotrain" to move passengers from one terminal to another.

Rebecca Sheir reports...

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