: News

Filed Under:

Child Sex-Trafficking Awareness In D.C.

Play associated audio

The city of D.C. and child advocates are declaring September Human Trafficking Awareness Month, with a campaign to alert the public to the trafficking of children right here in DC.

Head downtown on any given night, and you could be blocks, or steps, from this kind of exchange:

BUYER: Well, how young do you have?

PIMP: Well, I don't have nothing younger than 14.

BUYER: Fourteen's good.

PIMP: Okay.

That's a pimp, selling underage girls for sex. The buyer is actually an undercover agent from Shared Hope International, an international non-profit that taped the exchange. The organization is plastering Metro with warnings about child sex-trafficking.

Founder Linda Smith says 22 DC-area pimps were investigated and/or arrested for prostituting minors between January and July.

"What should have been summer break was a summer of being broken. We cannot allow our city to be the playground for pimps and traffickers," says Smith.

Tina Frundt was forced into prostitution when she was 14. Last year she founded Courtney's House, a shelter for sex-trafficked girls that is assisting the awareness campaign.

"This isn't something you get over in a year or two years. You have to get used to getting raped over and over again and everyone is saying it's all your fault," says Frundt. "It isn't your fault. Someone forced you."

Look around the Metro this month and you'll see bright yellow signs that offer a hotline number for victims. Some signs offer advice--A REAL BOYFRIEND WON'T ASK YOU TO HAVE SEX--others offer warnings--HAVE SEX WITH AN UNDERAGE PROSTITUTE AND YOU WON'T GET OFF.

Rebecca Sheir reports...

NPR

Opulent And Apolitical: The Art Of The Met's Islamic Galleries

Navina Haidar, an Islamic art curator at the Met, says she isn't interested in ideology: "The only place where we allow ourselves any passion is in the artistic joy ... of something that's beautiful."
NPR

Tired Of The Seoul-Sucking Rat Race, Koreans Flock To Farming

More than 80 percent of people in South Korea live in cities. But in the past few years, there has been a shift. Tens of thousands of South Koreans are relocating to the countryside each year.
WAMU 88.5

Fannie Lou Hamer and the Fight for Voting Rights

Kojo explores the life and legacy of Fannie Lou Hamer, a poor Mississippi sharecropper who became an outspoken voice in the civil rights movement and the fight for voting rights.

WAMU 88.5

Computer Guys and Gal

Chrysler recalls cars to boost their cybersecurity. Microsoft debuts its new Windows 10 operating system. And navigation tech could bring us robotic lawn mowers. The Computer Guys and Gal explain.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.