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Major Employment Outlook Survey Offers Mixed News for D.C. Area

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The largest employment outlook survey of its kind paints a dim job picture for the D.C. Metro area this fall.

The quarterly report by the international employment firm Manpower surveyed thousands of employers in the D.C. area about their staffing plans for October, November and December.

The bad news? Fifteen percent of firms expect to reduce their payrolls. "That's some of the more sobering information that we've seen from this result," says Tim Namie, Managing Director of Manpower International in Metro D.C.

But there is some good news in the report. Just under 70 percent of employers in our area expect to maintain their staffing levels over the next few months and 10 percent plan to hire new people.

"So between those two numbers you have some natural attrition amongst employers that are going to provide opportunities for new job seekers as well as the 10 percent who are actually going to add head count," says Namie.

But the area still lags just slightly behind national figures for new employment, with 12 percent of employers across the country saying they expect to increase payrolls. Namie says much of the hiring will be in retail and government jobs. The cutbacks will hit hardest in the construction, manufacturing, utilities and transportation sectors.

Mana Rabiee reports...

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