"Art Beat" with Stephanie Kaye - Monday, September 7, 2009 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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"Art Beat" with Stephanie Kaye - Monday, September 7, 2009

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(September 7) FEDERAL RESERVE IN CONCERT Federal Reserve is making an appearance - but don't worry. This local band has nothing to do with interest rates. Members of the folk-pop collective play at Iota Club & Cafe in Arlington on the first Monday of every month. The set begins at 8pm.

(Sept 8-Oct 25) AUSTRALIA AT AU American University hosts the Australian Indigenous Art Triennial at the Katzen Arts Center, with three exhibits from down under opening tomorrow and running through October 25th. Culture Warriors presents artists as champions of - in this case - 60,000 years of indigenous tradition, with works that range from paintings on bark to digital video. It's the largest installation of works from Australia to travel to the United States.

(September 8) GOLD MINE A special program at the National Archives highlights The Freedmen's Savings and Trust: A Gold Mine for Black and White Genealogists tomorrow morning at 11am. Experts in finding the deepest roots of family trees present information on how to track history through the Savings and Trust's deposit slips.

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Two Prominent Museum Directors Encourage 'New Ways Of Thinking'

Host Michel Martin speaks with the directors of the National Museum of African Art and the National Museum of the American Indian. Both institutions are celebrating important anniversaries this year.
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The Epic 2,200-Mile Tour De France Is Also A Test Of Epic Eating

Tour de France cyclists need to eat up to 9,000 calories a day to maintain their health and weight during the race. But many teams hire chefs to elevate the meals to gourmet status.
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California Nurses Union Braces For Contract Battle

The largest union of nurses in California starts contract negotiations Thursday with Kaiser Permanente's hospitals. Talks went smoothly four years ago, but this round will likely be more contentious.
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A Plan To Untangle Our Digital Lives After We're Gone

In the digital age, our online accounts don't die with us. A proposed law might determine what does happen to them. But the tech industry warns the measure could threaten the privacy of the deceased.

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