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"Art Beat" with Stephanie Kaye - Monday, September 7, 2009

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(September 7) FEDERAL RESERVE IN CONCERT Federal Reserve is making an appearance - but don't worry. This local band has nothing to do with interest rates. Members of the folk-pop collective play at Iota Club & Cafe in Arlington on the first Monday of every month. The set begins at 8pm.

(Sept 8-Oct 25) AUSTRALIA AT AU American University hosts the Australian Indigenous Art Triennial at the Katzen Arts Center, with three exhibits from down under opening tomorrow and running through October 25th. Culture Warriors presents artists as champions of - in this case - 60,000 years of indigenous tradition, with works that range from paintings on bark to digital video. It's the largest installation of works from Australia to travel to the United States.

(September 8) GOLD MINE A special program at the National Archives highlights The Freedmen's Savings and Trust: A Gold Mine for Black and White Genealogists tomorrow morning at 11am. Experts in finding the deepest roots of family trees present information on how to track history through the Savings and Trust's deposit slips.


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