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D.C. To Offer H1N1 Vaccine

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Swine Flu has infected well over 1 million people in the United States, and it is now the CDC's number one priority. In the District, Mayor Adrian Fenty says he will introduce an H1N1 vaccine by mid-October.

The District will put caretakers of infants and children first in line for the H1N1 vaccine. Other high-priority groups include pregnant women, health-care workers and people with underlying medical conditions.

As Fenty explains, the District is setting up H1N1 vaccine-distribution sites, toolkits for businesses and technology for tracking flu cases.

"We feel at this stage in the flu season, the District is doing as much to prepare for H1N1 as any jurisdiction in the country," says Fenty.

The Centers for Disease Control no longer recommend school closures in response to H1N1. But Fenty says the District will monitor infection rates in school-aged children.

"The District of Public Schools are putting in place continuing education plans for the hopefully small minority of students that may have to miss school due to H1N1," says Fenty.

Fenty urges people to prevent the spread of H1N1 by following three simple rules: stay home if you feel sick, cough into your sleeve, and wash your hands for at least twenty seconds. If you need a timer, the CDC recommend singing "Happy Birthday" twice.

Rebecca Sheir reports...

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