Virginian Shares Personal Story at Health Care Vigil | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Virginian Shares Personal Story at Health Care Vigil

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Health care remains a potent political issue despite the Congressional recess, and Americans are making their voices heard. About 100 people gathered at the U.S. Capitol to support a health care overhaul.

In the Senate Park, Mahdi Bray of Annandale stood among the crowd holding a lit candle. Bray wants Congress to change the current health care system so others will not suffer the way he has. He said he filed for bankruptcy after his wife gave birth to a premature baby. He said his insurance provider refused to cover all the care his daughter needed.

"It was a great trauma to our family because as we had to worry about our little one we ha d to find some way to deal with the incredible debts we had incurred that’s just simply because the insurance company was allowed to just bailout and say no we are not going to pay," he says.

Bray runs a political action committee in D.C. Progressive groups have helped organize similar events nationwide. They want a health care reform bill that includes a government insurance plan.

Sara Sciammacco reports...

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