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Young Workers Moving Back Home

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As the economy continues to shed jobs, more and more younger workers are moving back home or not moving out at all.

I meet up with Troy Wade, 30, one sunny afternoon in Georgetown. When Wade lost his job at a security firm this past year, he asked his parents if he could move back. They weren't thrilled.

"No they wasn't and I wasn't either to be asking them, but I just had to suck it up and do what I had to do. But it's temporary. I don't want to be there forever, I'm not gonna be like the 30 year old virgin or nothing like that," says Wade.

Wade has managed to find a new job as an energy consultant, but he still isn't ready to move out, citing the high cost of utilities, gas, and a new salary that's far below what he used to earn.

Wade is by no means alone. Jenn Jannon is regional director for Working America, the community affiliate of the AFL CIO.

"Young people are putting adulthood on hold, the economy is so bad for many of us under thirty five that in fact a third of us are still living at home with our parents," says Jannon.

With more than 400,000 jobs lost last month and students continuing to graduate, the trend isn't likely to stop anytime soon.

Sabri Ben-Achour reports...


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