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College Faculty Votes No Confidence Against President

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As the new school year begins, a majority of Montgomery Community College faculty members say they no longer support the school's president, Brian K. Johnson. They've made it clear by approving a no-confidence measure. The vote taken by 200 full time faculty members followed a letter written by selected faculty, asking the college's trustees to place the school's president on leave and investigate his activities. Rose Sachs is the president of the American Association of University Professors. She says concerned faculty have alleged excessive spending and a lack of leadership by Johnson -- and that's not all. "The other thing is be missing many, many, many meetings at the county and the state level, and particularly meetings that have to do with funding."

Excerpts of that letter published by the Washington Post describe Johnson as an administrator who on occasion "leaves his office for days without explanation, and has aimed...explosive and targeted rage on employees."

Some faculty members say they even fear there are listening devices and cameras placed by the administration in some offices and meeting rooms. According to Sachs "...people came to us, and gave us examples of why they thought there were recording devices, such as parts of conversation that were repeated verbatim."

During a brief phone interview, college president Brian Johnson only said "This is not the appropriate time," before he abruptly ended the call. Trustees plan to discuss the matter in a private meeting scheduled for later this week.

Elliott Francis reports...

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