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Best Bones Forever Goal For Girls

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BFF, or Best Friends Forever, is a popular term among girls, but doctors hope it will have another meaning.

When you're a young girl friends are everything, but so are healthy bones. The most crucial period for bone development in girls is ages 9 to 14, so Health and Human Services wants BBF, or "Best Bones Forever," to have an important meaning in the lives of girls.

Dr. Joan McGowan, Director of the Bone Diseases Program, says that time with friends is an opportunity for girls to develop healthy practices together. "Playing with their friends, dancing around, being physically active and then stopping for a nice smoothie that they put together themselves," says McGowan, giving examples of ways girls can have fun and promote bone health.

McGowan says building strong bones early will prevent osteoporosis later. She says girls don't get enough calcium or vitamin D, and this makes them more prone to injury during physical activity.

Kate Sheehy reports...

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