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Tributes To Kennedy At Grave Side Reveal His Wide Reach

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Mourners from as nearby as the Chinatown neighborhood of D.C. to as far away as Iran visited the grave site of the late Edward M. Kennedy. Under the shade of two maple trees are the simple white wooden cross and marble footstone that mark the final resting place of Ted Kennedy. His turf, of course, was Boston but his reach was wider than some would have guessed.

At Arlington National Cemetery, the visitors who came to pay their respects to the Lion of the Senate represented a kaleidoscope of home towns - and nations. Richmond, Virginia resident York Grey and her family emigrated to the U.S. from China in the late sixties because of immigration legislation created by Ted Kennedy. "If it had not been for the Kennedy family my entire family would not be here in America today and I just want to take this opportunity to say my farewells."

Farrokh Rahiminejad from DC remembers her father praising the Kennedy family when she was still a child in Iran. "Actually I knew them when I first recognized my left and right hand. I think I did good job I came here. I think 'I should do that' and I did right."

On Sunday, hundreds quietly filed past the late Senators' grave. The mood then was more somber than the reception his funeral motorcade received at the steps of the U.S. capitol earlier in the weekend.

Mana Rabiee reports...

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