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"Art Beat" with Stephanie Kaye - Monday, August 31, 2008

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(August 31-Sept 27) ECLIPSED AT WOOLLY Woolly Mammoth Theatre in downtown D.C. presents Eclipsed, opening tonight and running through September 27th. The show blends theater and human rights, telling the story of the wives of rebel leaders in Liberia who form a sisterhood of strength in wartime. You can meet the playwright after Friday's show, and participate in the Theatre for Human Rights discussion after the September 9th performance.

(Due September 8) GLEN ECHO CALLS The historic Glen Echo Park theater is putting out a call for proposals to individuals and organizations interested in staging social dances - the deadline for submissions is September 8th. About half a million foot-stompers take to the dance floor at Glen Echo each year, in waltzes and ballroom dancing, swing and salsa.

(Through September 20) DUBLIN CAROL Scena Theatre presents the Washington premiere of Dublin Carol, a dark Irish comedy running at the H Street Playhouse in Northeast D.C. through September 20th. Playwright Conor McPherson sets the scene on Christmas Eve, as the past catches up with the heavy-drinking, hard-living employee of a funeral parlor.


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