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Farmers' Almanac Calling for Cold Winter -- At Odds With NWS

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You might want to double-check your supply of long underwear and wool socks.

The venerable Farmers' Almanac predicts this winter will be colder than usual across much of the country--but Metropolitan Washington might get a break.

The 2010 edition of the Farmers' Almanac, which goes on sale Tuesday, says numbingly cold temperatures will prevail across three-fourths of the country, bringing a cool and snowy winter to the Northeast.

The almanac says residents in the D.C. area are in store for average winter temperatures--but should still get expect a few big winter storms.

The almanac, which has been published since 1818--claims an 80 to 85 percent accuracy rate. Editors say the forecasts are prepared two years in advance and are based on a secret formula using sun spots, planet positions and the effects of the moon.

The more scientific-based National Weather Service is actually calling for a warmer than normal winter.

Jonathan Wilson reports...

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