D.C. LGBT Advocate Wants More Aggressive Prosecution of Hate Crimes | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Filed Under:

D.C. LGBT Advocate Wants More Aggressive Prosecution of Hate Crimes

Play associated audio

Anti-violence advocates in Washington's gay and transgender community say the district still has a long way to go when it comes to fighting hate crimes.

The stabbing death of a 21 year old has put the issue back in the spotlight. Police say it's still too early to say whether the stabbing death of 21 year old Joshua Mack in broad daylight on Q Street in Northwest was definitely a hate crime.

Jennie Mayes has lived on the block for nearly 30 years -- and says her neighborhood was friendly to transgender people like Joshua Mack. "They give us respect and we give them respect," Mayes said.

Chris Farris, with the anti-violence task force GLOV, says he's been impressed by how police have handled the immediate aftermath of possible hate crimes. He's more worried about what happens to perpetrators of sexual-orientation based hate crimes once they've been arrested.

"What I am seeing is a lack of aggression in enforcing all the laws that we have to prosecute these crimes," Farris said.

A spokesman for the D.C. U.S. Attorney's Office says prosecutors take every homicide case seriously, regardless of the victims sexual orientation.

Jonathan Wilson reports...

NPR

Director Mike Nichols Remembered As A Comedian, Raconteur, Charmer

Robert Siegel remembers director and film icon Mike Nichols, who died Wednesday of a heart attack at 83.
NPR

Moderate Drinker Or Alcoholic? Many Americans Fall In Between

A study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds that 1 in 3 adults drinks excessively. That means eight or more drinks per week for women, and 15 or more drinks a week for men.
NPR

'I Will Not Sit Idly By' And Other Congressional Tweets On Immigration

Congress is out of session until the first week of December, so many members are weighing in on the president's speech on Twitter and other platforms — with mixed reactions.
NPR

Keep Your Head Up: 'Text Neck' Takes A Toll On The Spine

Newly published research finds that common texting posture can put as much as 60 pounds of force on the cervical spine.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.