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D.C. Impound Lot Sees Surge In Vehicles

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The District of Columbia claims better enforcement is the reason the city is doing a booming business in tickets and towing.

Jamila Bey visited an impound lot in Southwest. Thousands of cars sit behind a seemingly endless chain link fence. A narrow walkway is the only clue for drivers who have come to retrieve their vehicles. The city may boot and tow for two or more unpaid tickets within 60 days.

In the two hours Bey spent at Blue Plains, she watched 16 cars being towed onto the premises, and ten people claim their vehicles in the customer service office. Most were too infuriated about the impound lot experience to speak with me, but Kay Rigby says being towed is just part of owning a car in D.C.

Jerome says his business towing cars to Blue Plains is thriving.

The city argues that the number one complaint to the Department of Public Works is illegal parking. Still their own estimates show they'll raise nearly 13 million dollars more next year with 65 additional parking control officers slated to start in January.

Jamila Bey reports...

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