New Battles in Virginia's Civil War Fields | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Filed Under:

New Battles in Virginia's Civil War Fields

Play associated audio

After a recent decision to allow a Wal-Mart Supercenter to be built near a Civil War battlefield, preservationists remain up in arms.

Robert E. Lee and Ulysses S. Grant first met at Wilderness Battlefield 145 years ago. Now, protestors want to battle local officials who have decided to allow a Wal-Mart Supercenter to be built a half mile from the site in Locust Grove, Virginia. A coalition of groups organized by the Civil War Preservation Trust says they will apply "corporate pressure," enlisting celebrities and politicians to help persuade Wal-Mart not to build.

After a four-hour hearing on Monday, the Orange County Board of Supervisors decided to allow the Wal-Mart plan in the interest of jobs and an economic boost for the county. The coalition says it will attempt find a site farther away from Wilderness Battlefield to interest the retailer. About 3,000 people from across the country have mailed letters to the board protesting the plan.

Stephanie Kaye has more...

NPR

'Welcome To Braggsville' Isn't Quite 'Invisible Man,' But It's Close

T. Geronimo Johnson's latest follows four Berkeley students who take an American history class that leads to disaster. It's an ambitious book about race that wants to say something big about America.
NPR

Tea Tuesdays: Kenyan Farmers See Green In The Color Purple

Kenya has spent 25 years developing a purple "supertea" with high levels of antioxidants. The hope is that the tea will appeal to health-minded consumers and revive the country's struggling industry.
NPR

Round Two: Health Care Law Faces The Supreme Court Again

In King v. Burwell, Obamacare opponents are challenging it again, this time contending that a section of the law doesn't authorize subsidies to make mandated insurance affordable in 34 states.
NPR

Official Says FAA Is Trying To Keep Hackers Out Of Air Traffic Control

FAA Administrator Michael Huerta tells a House panel some vulnerabilities reported in a congressional study have been fixed, and the agency is working on others.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.