D.C. Remembers Senator Ted Kennedy | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Filed Under:

D.C. Remembers Senator Ted Kennedy

Play associated audio

Massachusetts Senator Ted Kennedy's death came as Congress was in recess. Even on a quiet summer morning in the district, signs of his death were everywhere.

Senator Kennedy's roots in D.C. went deep. For about the last decade, Senator Kennedy lived at this stately cream-colored two-story home in the Kalorama neighborhood of northwest--when he was in the district. This morning, the home looked empty, with just a single light on inside, in a hallway behind the front door, fronted by two marble columns.

Down on Capitol Hill, few Congressional staffers were walking into the Russell Senate Office building, where Kennedy's office is located. Flags had been lowered to half-staff at all senate and house office buildings. Workers were busy lowering American flags at many other buildings across the district.

On Massachusetts Avenue, named for Kennedy's home state, flags were lowered at the headquarters of the SEIU, and the Johns Hopkins University campus.

Matt Bush reports...

NPR

High Tea, Afternoon Tea, Elevenses: English Tea Times For Dummies

It's easy to get overwhelmed by the English and their social tea traditions. What time are they each at, anyways? But don't fret. The Salt is here to offer guidance.
NPR

Communities Get A Lift As Local Food Sales Surge To $11 Billion A Year

The U.S. Department of Agriculture says local food is growing quickly from a niche market into something that's generating significant income for communities across the country.
NPR

Chris Christie Becomes 14th Republican Presidential Candidate

With New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie in the race, there are now 14 Republican candidates for president. Two more are expected to join by the end of July.
NPR

Flood Maps Can Get Much Sharper With A Little Supercomputing Oomph

Entrepreneurs are turning to Oak Ridge National Lab's supercomputer to make all sorts of things, including maps that are much more accurate in predicting how a neighborhood will fare in a flood.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.