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Hundreds Attend International Swine Flu Conference In D.C.

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With area schools set to open soon, school leaders have ramped up talks on preparing for a possible swine flu outbreak. Many participated in a three-day conference in Washington this week.

Hundreds of people from around the country and the world were at the International Swine Flu Conference at the Hyatt Hotel. The gathering shows how seriously community and business leaders are taking a possible H1N1 Flu outbreak this fall. Rob Rogalski handles emergency preparedness at the Rand Corporation, which has offices in Northern Virginia.

"I am here just to increase my body of knowledge, find out what people are talking about because we do expect this thing to increase in the fall," says Rogalski. "So I want to make sure our corporation is prepared and we are doing the right thing to take care of our employees."

Health experts urged parents to keeps kids at home if they are sick, and told workers to take advantage of hand sanitizers in buildings... as well as to stay informed about their employer's response plan. Participants didn't leave with all the answers but said they have a better idea of what to work on.

Manuel Quinones reports...


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