AKA Lawsuit Questions $500,000 Payment To Sorority President | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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AKA Lawsuit Questions $500,000 Payment To Sorority President

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Members of the nation's oldest black sorority are suing Alpha Kappa Alpha to remove their president. Now they're calling into question $500,000 that they say was paid to her in less than two months.

A website for plaintiffs has posted copies of checks made out to AKA President Barbara McKinzie. An attorney for the plaintiffs, Edward W. Gray Jr., says the check copies were sent to them anonymously. Gray called the payments into question in a letter to sorority lawyers last week.

"This is just one additional shocking set of facts, added to a long list of shocking facts that are disclosed in our complaint," Gray said in a phone interview.

A lawyer representing AKA replied that the sorority would continue conducting business during the pending litigation.

The lawsuit filed in June in Washington, where the sorority is chartered, says McKinzie spent hundreds of thousands of dollars in AKA money on herself, some of it to pay for a wax statue of herself for a Baltimore museum.

Jonathan Wilson reports...

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