Glimmers of Hope in Local Real Estate Market | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Filed Under:

Glimmers of Hope in Local Real Estate Market

Play associated audio

Most analysts say the country's economic recovery will be slow and likely painful -- but a report on the local real estate market holds a bit of good news.

The report from Metropolitan Regional Information Systems -- shows that home sales in July continued the upward trend the area has seen in recent months, and are up 12 percent compared to July of last year.

Home prices across the region are still down 8 percent compared to this time last year. But John Mcclain, a senior fellow at the Center for Regional Analysis and George Mason University -- says that number is a sign the free fall in prices is coming to an end. They were down 26 compared to last year percent as recently as February.

Leading the area is Prince George's County, which saw a 76% increase in number of homes sold compared to July of Last year. At the bottom is Prince William County, Virginia. The number there is down 25%.

Jonathan Wilson reports...

NPR

The World Music Education of Philip Glass

In his new memoir, Music Without Words, the composer explains how a chance meeting with Ravi Shankar sparked a fascination with the cultures of the world and their music.
NPR

PepsiCo Swaps Diet Drink's Aspartame For Other Artificial Sweeteners

The company says Diet Pepsi consumers are concerned about aspartame. But the Food and Drug Administration has long affirmed that the sweetener is safe in amounts commonly used by beverage companies.
NPR

8 Obama Jokes That Stood Out From The White House Correspondents Dinner

Every year, the president sits down for dinner with Washington reporters and delivers a standup routine. From his "bucket list" to Hillary Clinton, here's what he came up with this year.
NPR

As Health Apps Hop On The Apple Watch, Privacy Will Be Key

The notion of receiving nutrition advice from artificial intelligence on your wrist may seem like science fiction. But health developers are betting this kind of behavior will become the norm.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.