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D.C. Recieves Almost Nine Million Dollars In Energy Stimulus Money

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D.C. has received almost nine million dollars in energy stimulus finds, most of which will be used to improve energy efficiency in government buildings. The federal money will pay for high efficiency lighting in athletic facilities and train youth in green construction.

But George Hawkins, head of the District Department of the Environment, says the money will primarily be used on retrofitting heating and cooling systems in district buildings, including schools, firehouses and government facilities.

Hawkins says there will be multiple benefits, including additional jobs created, and less energy consumed. While Hawkins didn't have a dollar amount available, he did say the savings would be "significant."

One million dollars will be set aside to fund competitive grants for energy efficiency project ideas. District officials will also work to adopt green building codes by developing training sessions and testing materials. The District is expecting to receive an additional 11 million dollars in energy stimulus funds.

Kavitha Cardoza reports...

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