Tourists In D.C. Have Health Care On Their Minds | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Tourists In D.C. Have Health Care On Their Minds

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Jim Samek and his family drove 12 hours from Central Illinois to see the sights in Washington. They're on the steps of the U.S. Capitol, a building currently devoid of any actual lawmakers.

Samek doesn't care what Congress does to fix the country's health care system, as long as it does something. "It doesn't work now," he says, "So anything they do is going to be better than what it is now."

Samek is a self-employed contractor and he says he's had lots of trouble with his health insurance. "I've actually had a company that went bankrupt on me," he says, "And then I was stuck with the bills."

Cody Simpson from Chattanooga, Tennessee has a different viewpoint. "I like my health care right now," she says. "I'm OK with that."

Simpson thinks health care reform will be a financial burden on the country and she wishes Congress would slow down.

"I feel like things are happening way too quickly," she says, "And we're not looking at what's actually going to happen and the long term consequences of it."

Congress members will return to Washington, and to the health care debate, after Labor Day.

David Schultz reports...

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