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Health Care Union Uses Annual Picnic to Spread Awareness

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Local members of a major health care union relaxed during their annual picnic but organizers want the rank and file to prepare for health care reform.

Mary Kay Henry is a Vice President of the Service Employees International Union - or SEIU - which represents two million health care workers.

She's not normally in DC but she came to Fort Lincoln Park in Northeast Washington to tell District members how important the national debate in health care reform will be this August.

"We want to make sure that we work with our employers to help educate, retrain, and redeploy workers where the new need will be in the health care system."

Henry says her union is confident that the transition from emergency to preventive care for uninsured patients will start as early as next year, and she wants to make sure the three thousand workers her union represents in Washington will survive the shift.

Mana Rabiee reports...

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