Secular Coalition Opens K Street Headquarters | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Secular Coalition Opens K Street Headquarters

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An organization that defends the rights of Americans who don't believe in any god is opening its headquarters in Washington. The Secular Coalition for America will join other lobbying groups that have set up shop on K Street. Executive Director Sean Faircloth conceeds that there's lots of work to be done to ensure the separation of church and state. The coalition will start by raising the visibility of people who don't subscribe to any faith. Faircloth says the coalition's priorities are eliminating religious discrimination in the military, ensuring that religious organizations aren't favored over other groups and reforming faith-based initiatives. He admits that it's difficult to fight the concepts that America is a "Christian" nation and that it's anti-American to hold that religious convictions should be private. The Secular Coalition for America estimates that 12 percent of Americans consider themselves to be non-believers.

Jamila Bey reports...

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