: News

"Art Beat" with Stephanie Kaye - Wednesday, September 24, 2008

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[Breaking News: Renaissance Journalism and the Birth of the Newspaper]() opens at the Folger Shakespeare Library on September 25th, 2008, and runs through January 31st, 2009.  ) RENAISSANCE JOURNALISM
[]() through January 31st, every day - except Sundays - from 10am to 5pm. Not unlike many in the D.C. region today, the men and women of Renaissance England were also news junkies, curious about skirmishes on the battlefields as well as the scoop from scandal-filled salons. The exhibit traces the evolution of the newspaper from its origins in rumor-filled letters to the first stirrings of American journalism spanning the 16th and 17th centuries.< />< />
Folger Shakespeare Library
[Breaking News: Renaissance Journalism and the Birth of the Newspaper]() opens at the Folger Shakespeare Library on September 25th, 2008, and runs through January 31st, 2009. ) RENAISSANCE JOURNALISM []() through January 31st, every day - except Sundays - from 10am to 5pm. Not unlike many in the D.C. region today, the men and women of Renaissance England were also news junkies, curious about skirmishes on the battlefields as well as the scoop from scandal-filled salons. The exhibit traces the evolution of the newspaper from its origins in rumor-filled letters to the first stirrings of American journalism spanning the 16th and 17th centuries.< />< />
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