In 1986, a federal official issued a warning: If Metro continued to expand rapidly, the system faced a future of stark choices over maintaining existing infrastructure. Metro chose expansion. We talk to a historian about that decision. We also hear from a former Metro general manager about the following years, and from an Arlington planner about measuring how riders are responding to SafeTrack.

WAMU 88.5

D.C. Health Department Says Pot Sales Should Be Legal, But Congress Still Says No

The D.C. Department of Health says D.C. officials should consider legalizing, regulating and taxing the sale of marijuana. The only problem? Congress won't allow it.
WAMU 88.5

Dispute Between D.C. Council Members Could Derail Bike And Pedestrian Safety Bill

Bicyclists who are found even 1 percent at fault in an accident often cannot get compensation for injuries. That would change under proposed legislation before the D.C. Council, but two legislators are sparring over the extent of the law.

WAMU 88.5

Metro Ridership Is Down, With WMATA Pointing To External Forces For Drop

Metro ridership remains well below its 2009 peak, but officials at the transit agency are pointing to structural problems instead of service that has been widely regarded as poor.

WAMU 88.5

Bowser Signs Bill Raising D.C.'s Minimum Wage To $15, With Nod From Obama

"I commend the District of Columbia, Mayor Muriel Bowser, and the Council of the District of Columbia for raising the District's minimum wage," said President Barack Obama in a statement on Monday evening.

Why Fight Poverty When You Can End It? Padua Project Calls The Nonprofit Bluff

Charities and social services organizations have tried to tackle poverty for years. But what if instead of just fighting poverty a nonprofit sought to end it for good? Is that even possible?

WAMU 88.5

How Traditional Nonprofits Run Into Problems Trying To Tackle Poverty

Poverty is a more complicated issue than many people realize, and organizations trying to tackle it often run into institutional roadblocks.

WAMU 88.5

Black D.C. Residents More Likely To Fear For Safety And Distrust Police, Says Survey

There are stark disparities in feelings of safety between the District's 8 wards, with the city's African American population also reporting greater distrust of police.
NPR

Newly Released Call Logs Reveal Chaos Inside Pulse Nightclub

Victims called 911 as they heard and saw Omar Mateen shooting inside. The newly released records show Mateen holed up in the bathroom shortly after he started firing. Dispatchers counted the gunshots.
NPR

Obama's New Clean Energy Goal For North America: 50 Percent By 2025

White House aides acknowledge that the plan, to be announced by President Obama and his counterparts in Canada and Mexico, is a "stretch goal." The commitment goes beyond the Paris climate agreement.
NPR

To Change Police Practices, A Push For Liability Insurance In Minneapolis

American cities pay out hundreds of millions a year to settle police misconduct complaints and lawsuits. An advocacy group in Minneapolis wants to require cops to pay for their own insurance.
NPR

Pat Summitt, Legendary Tennessee Basketball Coach, Dies At 64

Summitt coached the University of Tennessee Lady Vols for nearly 40 seasons, winning eight national championships. She has the most wins by a Division I college basketball coach — men's or women's.
NPR

Attack At Istanbul's International Airport Kills At Least 10 People

Gunfire and an explosion hit Istanbul's Ataturk International Airport, where at least 10 people have died, according to the Turkish Justice Ministry.
NPR

Money, Hate And Hard Feelings: Brexit Fallout Continues In U.K., Europe

The U.K.'s credit rating has been downgraded. British police say there's been a rise in reports of hate crime incidents. And passions ran high on the floor of the EU.
NPR

Benghazi Committee Faults Military Response To 2012 Attack

The 800-page report follows a lengthy and politically contentious investigation that had thrust Hillary Clinton's tenure as secretary of state into the spotlight.
NPR

Ancient Shipwreck Off Greek Island Yields A Different Sort Of Treasure

Divers exploring the famous Antikythera shipwreck, 200 feet beneath the water's surface in Greece, have turned up a heavy object they think might have been a powerful weapon in the first century B.C.