News | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio
Protesters in Baltimore continue to demand answers about how Freddie Gray reportedly suffered a fatal spinal injury while he was in police custody. The case is raising new questions about Maryland's Law Enforcement Officers Bill of Rights and the balance between due process for police officers and the public's right to know what happened.
WAMU 88.5

Does Virginia's House Of Delegates Have A Transparency Problem?

In Virginia, members of the House of Delegates consider thousands of bills during each session. But the vast majority of them are dismissed without any debate or even a recorded vote.
WAMU 88.5

Picky Pollinator Finds Maryland Less Positive For Procreation

The insect in question is the Baltimore checkerspot, and there are only 11 wild colonies left, all in the state's western end.

WAMU 88.5

Bowser And Racine Spar Over Power Of Newly Elected Attorney General

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser and Attorney General Karl Racine are fighting over competing visions as to how much power the newly elected attorney general's office should have.
WAMU 88.5

7 Tips For Going Organic With D.C. Chef Nora Pouillon

Chef Nora Pouillon founded the first certified organic restaurant in the country back in 1979. With a little direction, she says going organic in your everyday cooking might not be as hard as you think.

WAMU 88.5

How Some Maryland Bars Have Been Breaking An Election Day Law For Decades

Electoral politics can be enough to drive anybody to drink — but until this legislative session, one Maryland city had laws on the books that specifically prohibited hitting the suds on election night.

WAMU 88.5

Speed Does Kill: Study Reaffirms Ideas Behind D.C. Pedestrian Safety Plan

As D.C. becomes the seventh U.S. city attempting to eliminate all traffic deaths, a new study is cementing the link between high speeds and the failure to yield to pedestrians.

WAMU 88.5

Fairfax County Growing Much Slower Than Its Neighbors, Census Shows

In the last five years, Fairfax County, Virginia, has seen the slowest rate of population growth in the region.
WAMU 88.5

How The D.C. Region Became Among The Most Uber-Friendly In The U.S.

With regulation for ride-hailing apps passed in D.C., Virginia and now Maryland, the National Capital region is among the most favorable in the country for the likes of Uber. But why here and not elsewhere?

NPR

The Day One Man Decided To Give Up His Gun

In the 1970s, Pastor David Ned learned an important lesson about himself after what could have been a tragic situation.
NPR

Will Apple's Newest Gadget Ignite A Smart Watch Movement?

As Apple's smart watch goes on sale, there are some big questions about the whole idea of the wrist watch as a computer, including whether consumers come to see them as a luxury or a necessity.
NPR

After 25 Years, The Hubble Space Telescope Still Wows Humanity

Launched shortly after the fall of the Berlin Wall, the Hubble telescope isn't showing its age. Astronomers and other fans hope this old charmer will be useful for many years to come.

NPR

Why Do Mosquitoes Like To Bite You Best? It's In Your Genes

Researchers set hungry mosquitoes loose on identical and fraternal twins. They found that inherited genes do play a role in making you a mosquito magnet.
NPR

Europe Grapples With How To Deal With Influx Of Migrants

Thousands cross the Mediterranean hoping to escape civil instability or economic hardship. Renee Montagne talks to Joel Millman of the International Organization for Migration about Europe's response.
NPR

Kidnappers In Mexico Now Target Undocumented Migrants

David Greene talks with Sarah Stillman of The New Yorker about her report on kidnappers in Mexico who are grabbing thousands of Central American migrants every year, as they travel to the U.S.
NPR

China's Latest Target: Funeral Strippers

In some parts of rural China and in Taiwan, hiring strippers to perform at the funeral of a loved one isn't considered absurd, but a good idea.
NPR

The Nearly Lost Story Of Cambodian Rock 'N' Roll

Before the Khmer Rouge regime, a thriving pop and rock scene adapted Western music heard on U.S. military radio stations. The documentary Don't Think I've Forgotten took 10 years to make.