WAMU 88.5 : Community

How To Submit a Public Service Announcement

Public Service Announcements are offered as a community service by WAMU 88.5 FM. They are reserved for non-profit organizations, for publicizing events or services, and for requesting volunteers.

Public Service Announcements can only be submitted by email to calendar@wamu.org. Please do not mail or fax your announcement.

  • All potential PSAs be submitted at least 3 weeks prior to the event.
  • We prefer to get prepared scripts, but you can also send us a press release or brochure. Pre-produced PSAs are not accepted under any circumstances.
  • Please include a telephone number that our listeners can contact for more information. We also recommend including a web address and/or an email address.
  • No events or services costing more than $50 will be considered.
  • Because of their limited audience, PSA's for college or high school reunions and church/synagogue/mosque events will not be considered.
  • FCC regulations discourage Public Radio Stations from promoting fundraisers for other organizations, even non-profits.
  • Due to the high volume of PSA requests, we cannot notify you as to whether your PSA was aired on WAMU.
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