WAMU 88.5 : Community

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Community Minute: Support For Children Experiencing Homelessness

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The Homeless Children’s Playtime Project is a non-profit organization which provides support services to children experiencing homelessness at five different shelters and transitional living programs across the city. Using trained volunteers and staff, the organization oversees programs in shelters and transitional housing for children, from babies to teenagers undergoing periods of homelessness. Through thirteen weekly children’s programs, volunteers provide games, chances to learn through art, movement and play, one-on-one attention, and caring adult supervision for children. The organization also provides support for the entire family with parent support and referrals, and clothing and school supply donations. Older children accompany volunteers on field trips throughout the year and take a break from weekends staying in a shelter.

For more information, contact:

The Homeless Children’s Playtime Project
St. Stephen and the Incarnation Episcopal Church
1525 Newton Street, NW
Washington, DC 20010
202-329-4481
info@playtimeproject.org 


Support for the WAMU 88.5 Community Minute is provided by Meyer Foundation.

 
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