WAMU 88.5 : Community

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Community Minute: Teaching youth to use photography as an advocacy tool

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Critical Exposure teaches youth to use photography as a medium of self-expression and advocacy.  Through in-school and extracurricular programs, internships, and fellowships, students learn to identify and label problems around them so that they can effectively capture those issues through photography and present them to the community. Notable projects include students’ efforts to address the “School-to-Prison Pipeline,” which refers to the relationship between punishment in school and later incarceration, and the related socioeconomic and racial factors. In addition to basic photography skills, the organization’s curriculum emphasizes critical and creative thinking so that students can advocate for themselves and their communities.

For more information, contact:
Critical Exposure
1816 12th St. NW, 3rd Fl.
Washington, D.C. 20009
202-745-3745

Support for the WAMU 88.5 Community Minute is provided by the Meyer Foundation.


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