WAMU 88.5 : Community

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Community Minute: Dance instruction and performances for people of all ages

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Joy of Motion Dance Center was founded in 1976 as a way to bring dance to the Washington, D.C., community. Today, Joy of Motion Dance Center comprises three studio locations and a multitude of dance classes for all ages to live out its motto of “Dance is for Everyone.” The three studios serve thousands of individuals in the community, ranging from children as young as 25 months to adults 55 and up. The organization offers a broad array of dance classes and productions, including numerous youth and adult classes, companies, and workshops, dance fitness classes, and summer camps. “Project Motion” is the center’s community outreach initiative serving the greater DC area. Programs include free classes for K-12 charter school students, free dance classes and performances which emphasize dance as an alternative to destructive behaviors, free classes and performances for senior citizens, and need-based scholarships for local students.

For more information, contact:
Joy of Motion Dance Center
1333 H Street NE
Washington, DC 20002
202.399.6763
atlas@joyofmotion.org

7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 180E
Bethesda, MD 20814
301.986.0016
bethesda@joyofmotion.org

5207 Wisconsin Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20015
202.362.3042
friendshipheights@joyofmotion.org 

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