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88.3 Ocean City: Health professionals serving the Eastern Shore region

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The Eastern Shore Area Health Education Center (AHEC) is a private, non-profit organization that services the nine counties comprising Maryland’s Eastern Shore. AHEC’s goals are to increase the number of health care providers who provide services in rural and underserved areas and eliminate health disparities among diverse populations of the Eastern Shore by providing and coordinating programs that improve the health status of all. AHEC works with area educational institutions to promote careers in health to youth and college students. The organization also helps retain health care professionals in the region by providing continuing education opportunities and providing housing for students doing health care rotations in rural communities. Additionally, AHEC provides opportunities for student professionals gain hands-on experience through administering oral health care to low-income families and participating in workshops that help them learn how to provide care for aging patients.

For more information, contact:
Eastern Shore Area Health Education Center
814 Chesapeake Drive
Cambridge, MD 21613
Phone: 410-221-2600
esahec@esahec.org

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