Community Minute: Emergency funds for Arlington residents in crisis | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Community Minute: Emergency funds for Arlington residents in crisis

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Arlington Thrive is a nonprofit organization which provides emergency assistance to residents of Arlington Co. experiencing sudden financial crises. Most clients are the working poor, elderly and disabled people on a fixed income, and the homeless and formerly homeless who need funds as a “safety net” until they are able to get back on firmer financial footing. Arlington Thrive’s same-day, one-time emergency assistance program helps residents pay rent, medical and dental bills, prescriptions, transportation and work-related expenses. The organization also provides interest-free loans to be used for security deposits by families seeking to move into permanent housing in Section 8 rental units. Arlington Thrive’s “EnergyShare” program helps residents with the costs of home heating and cooling bills. The organization’s Dress for Work Success program helps clients transition into a life of self-sufficiency by providing new professional work attire at the completion of an employment program.

For more information, contact:
Arlington Thrive
P.O. Box 7429
Arlington, VA 22207

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