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Community Minute: Musical instruction for young people in D.C. metro region

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The DC Youth Orchestra Program (DCYOP) is a nonprofit organization that aims to provide affordable, accessible, quality music instruction and performance opportunities for young people in the D.C. metropolitan area. DCYOP makes itself accessible to young people who feel compelled to be a part of an orchestral music experience without respect to economic means or social circumstances. Instruction is available for all orchestra and wind ensemble instruments at all levels and age ranges. Students participate in classes for their individual instrument or section, and also participate in a major ensemble. DCYOP believes that achieving excellence - as an individual musician and in an ensemble – is a transformative experience – building skill, pride, humility, and self-esteem. Every year, almost 600 children play in the DC Youth Orchestra Program. Students pay a portion of the costs of programs offered by DCYOP; however, all students are accepted regardless of experience or income level.

For more information, contact:
DC Youth Orchestra Program
1700 E. Capitol St. NE   
Washington, DC 20003
202-723-4555

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