WAMU 88.5 : Community

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Community Minute: Creating a thriving green industry in D.C.

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DC Greenworks is a nonprofit organization working to promote the growth of a thriving green industry in DC and the Chesapeake Bay watershed by encouraging conservation and reuse of rainwater using green infrastructure technologies. To do this, DC Greenworks provides full-service green roof, rain barrel and rain garden design, installation and consulting to property owners, businesses and communities throughout the D.C. metro area. The organization works with D.C. schools and universities and engages students in installation of green roofs, rain gardens, cisterns and other stormwater best management practices on school grounds. DC Greenworks also helps implement urban agriculture projects such as rooftop farming, and rainwater harvesting and reuse for schools and community gardens. In tandem with partner organizations throughout the region, DC Greenworks also offers green jobs training through hands-on green infrastructure and LID installation projects.

For more information, contact:
DC Greenworks
1341 H Street, NE, Suite 203
Washington, DC 20002
info@dcgreenworks.org
202-518-6195

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