WAMU 88.5 : Community

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Community Minute: Using filmmaking as a tool for social change

Docs In Progress is a non-profit organization dedicated to empowering independent documentary filmmakers and educating the public about documentary as a form of art, expression, and social change.

In order to help encourage new and diverse voices in documentary film, Docs in Progress offers an array of programs aimed at aspiring and emerging filmmakers and the broader community. Docs In Progress leads classes and workshops, teaching topics such as camera, video editing, and marketing for first-time and more experienced documentary filmmakers. The organization also provides opportunities for filmmakers to screen their films and receive constructive feedback from audiences in a nurturing workshop space. For youth interested in making documentaries, the organization operates a two-week summer day camp where participants produce a short film in downtown Silver Spring. Docs In Progress organizes an annual community film festival in Silver Spring to showcase works produced by adult and youth first-time filmmakers about individuals, small businesses, and nonprofit organizations in the community.

For more information, contact:
Docs In Progress
8700 First Avenue
Silver Spring, Md., 20910
(301) 789-2797
contact@docsinprogress.org

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