WAMU 88.5 : Community

Community Minute: Mobile tutoring and wraparound services for D.C. students from Ward 8

The mission of Horton's Kids is to educate and empower the children of Washington, D.C.’s Ward 8 by providing comprehensive, direct services which improve the quality of their daily lives and nurture each child’s desire and ability to succeed.

With its wraparound approach, Horton’s Kids provides resources to more than 300 children and youth, from early childhood through high school graduation and beyond. The organization has developed the “mobile tutoring approach,” in which buses take the children from their neighborhood to federal office buildings where they meet with one-on-one volunteer tutors. Monday and Tuesday evening tutoring sessions take place in the Rayburn House Office Building, and Wednesday after-school sessions are at the U.S. Department of Education. Horton’s Kids also provides a program for older youth, enrichment field trips, a literacy focused-summer camp, family activities, health and basic needs services, and educational advocacy.

For more information, contact:
Horton’s Kids
110 Maryland Avenue NE, Suite 207
Washington, D.C. 20002
202.544.5033

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