WAMU 88.5 : Community

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Community Minute: Teaching children about environmental issues through community gardens

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City Blossoms is a nonprofit organization in Washington, D.C., dedicated to building kid-driven, community engaging, creative green spaces. The organization has created gardens where children are the main cultivators in various communities around the Washington, D.C., and Baltimore areas, using the sites to teach children more about the environment and the world around them. City Blossoms also uses its Girard Community Garden as the site for its Herb Community-Supported Agriculture (CSA) Project, which provides herbs to individuals, restaurants and caterers for a membership fee. All City Blossoms projects are organic and designed to work with the local environment and community needs. Additionally, City Blossoms facilitates educational programming on gardening and green spaces in classrooms and other learning centers. The group’s instructors provide lessons for studying the growth cycle, nutrition, agricultural traditions and environmental structures and offer most sessions in English and/or Spanish.

For more information, contact:
City Blossoms
443.854.1669

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