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Community Minute: Educating D.C. youth through food and cooking

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Brainfood is a organization that gives D.C. youth the opportunity to experience food in creative, educational, and engaging ways.

Brainfood is a nonprofit youth development organization based in Washington, D.C., where high school-aged youth can learn about food, nutrition, cooking, and jobs in the food industry through activities, games, restaurant visits, cooking in our kitchen, and working with guest chefs. Through culinary-related activities, Brainfood promotes active learning, self-reliance and healthy living to empower youth as resources in their own community. The Kitchen All Stars program introduces participants to learning life skills and leadership skills through food and cooking. Brainfood graduates in the Community MVPs program build job and presentation skills by planning and facilitating healthy cooking workshops for groups in need of food education resources. The Summer Institute gives youth a way to stay in the kitchen during the summer months.

For more information, contact:
1525 Newton St NW
Washington, D.C. 20010


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