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Community Minute: Technology-driven Education For Youth and Adults in the District

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While unemployment in the District remains lower than the national average, many unemployed residents lack the education and training necessary to obtain available jobs. In an effort to equip residents for the workforce, Urban Ed provides children, youth, and adults in the District of Columbia with technology-driven education, information and skill development.

Urban Ed uses technology as a vehicle for helping adults acquire marketable workplace skills in the area of information technology, and to help children improve in key academic subjects. The IT Help Desk Apprenticeship offers unemployed and underemployed individuals an opportunity to receive training as a computer technician and pursue IT certifications in preparation for employment at a computer help desk or call center. The apprenticeship includes live instructor training, on-the-job training, e-learning, and remedial support to ensure a successful job placement. Urban Ed also operates the TechnoAcademy, an out-of-school time enrichment program which teaches teens business and technical skills; and the Lilbitties TechnoCamp for children ages 5 and 6 during the summer months.

For more information, contact:
Urban Ed, Inc.
2041 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., SE
Suite M-2
Washington, DC 20020
202.610.2344
info@UrbanEd.org

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