WAMU 88.5 : Community

Friday Morning Music Club

On Thursday, January 19, 2012, join Fairfax's Friday Morning Music Club for a free concert at Old Town Hall, 3999 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030. A community of music lovers and musicians, the Friday Morning Music Club, Inc., has promoted classical music in the Washington area for over 120 years. FMMC's public concerts — now held throughout the week — provide performing members with a host of outlets for their talents and delight audiences in Washington D.C., Maryland, and Virginia. All concerts are free and performed as a public service. Outreach recitals at senior facilities, in-home musicales, and master classes provide additional opportunities for members to explore music together without audition.

The Club also fosters the development of local talent through competitions for local students and recitals by student members. Through the Friday Morning Music Club Foundation, it supports renowned international competitions for emerging professional string players, pianists, and singers, and for composers. For program details, please visit the group's website or call 703-273-6097. This is a free performance presented by the City of Fairfax Commission on the Arts.


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