WAMU 88.5 : Community

Community Minute: Empowering District Students To Stay In School And Prepare For The Future

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Every day, approximately 7,000 students, nationwide, drop out of high school*. Communities in Schools (CIS) of the Nation’s Capital works to foster a community of support to empower students in the District to stay in school and prepare for life.

Communities In Schools of the Nation’s Capital (CIS of the Nation’s Capital) partners with the District of Columbia Public Schools to provide whole school, targeted and case managed services to more than 2,300 pre-kindergarten through 12th grade students attending schools in Wards 1, 5 and 8. CIS of the Nation’s Capital provides wraparound services and resources for students in efforts to boost graduation and attendance rates, and improve student behavior. Services include homework help for students, one-on-one literacy tutoring, mentoring, cultural field trips, arts workshops, weekend and summer programs. The organization also provides individual and group counseling and parent engagement workshops.

For more information, contact:
Communities in Schools of the Nation’s Capital

3121 South St. NW
Washington DC, 20007

*Statistic from the Alliance for Excellent Education

This Community Minute is part of American Graduate on WAMU 88.5. "American Graduate:  Let’s Make It Happen," a public media initiative supported by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting to help local communities across America address the dropout crisis.


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