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Courses for adults in Virginia looking to enhance computer skills

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It is increasingly relevant that all potential employees are computer literate as many employers require members of their workforce to utilize computer skills. Computer CORE is providing an opportunity to low-income Northern Virginian residents to achieve computer literacy.

Computer CORE., a nonprofit organization with locations in Alexandria, Fairfax, Falls Church and Herndon is working to promote computer literacy in low-income adults to help them achieve career aspirations and self-sufficiency. Computer CORE  also partners with Northern Virginia Community College, so students have the opportunity to enroll in college, receive financial aid and earn 7 college credits for their work at CORE. Computer CORE offers a six-month training course to help students learn computer basics such as: keyboarding; working with Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint; using email and the Internet. Volunteer instructors advise and mentor students, identifying existing skills, nurturing interests and working on resumes, cover letters, and job search strategies. After two months, students receive a free computer to practice their skills at home and share them with family members.

For more information, contact:
Computer CORE
3846 King Street
Alexandria, VA 22302
Phone: 703.931.7346

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