WAMU 88.5 : Community

Filed Under:

Courses for adults in Virginia looking to enhance computer skills

Play associated audio

It is increasingly relevant that all potential employees are computer literate as many employers require members of their workforce to utilize computer skills. Computer CORE is providing an opportunity to low-income Northern Virginian residents to achieve computer literacy.

Computer CORE., a nonprofit organization with locations in Alexandria, Fairfax, Falls Church and Herndon is working to promote computer literacy in low-income adults to help them achieve career aspirations and self-sufficiency. Computer CORE  also partners with Northern Virginia Community College, so students have the opportunity to enroll in college, receive financial aid and earn 7 college credits for their work at CORE. Computer CORE offers a six-month training course to help students learn computer basics such as: keyboarding; working with Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint; using email and the Internet. Volunteer instructors advise and mentor students, identifying existing skills, nurturing interests and working on resumes, cover letters, and job search strategies. After two months, students receive a free computer to practice their skills at home and share them with family members.

For more information, contact:
Computer CORE
3846 King Street
Alexandria, VA 22302
Phone: 703.931.7346

NPR

How Fishermen's Bragging Rights Gave Birth To Fine Art

In 19th century Japan, fishermen found a foolproof way to record trophy catches: a "fish rubbing" inked onto paper, creating a permanent record of their size. Gyotaku soon evolved into fine art.
NPR

How Fishermen's Bragging Rights Gave Birth To Fine Art

In 19th century Japan, fishermen found a foolproof way to record trophy catches: a "fish rubbing" inked onto paper, creating a permanent record of their size. Gyotaku soon evolved into fine art.
NPR

Donald Trump In 9 Quotes And 200 Seconds

Trump took his act on the road to Tennessee, where he thrilled a conservative audience with an off-the-cuff routine that bordered on stand-up comedy.
NPR

No More Standing By The Spigot: Messaging App Alerts Water Availability

A startup in India — where an aging, ad hoc system limits water availability — is using text messages to let people know when their faucets should work, so they don't waste hours awaiting the deluge.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.