WAMU 88.5 : Community

Filed Under:

Mentors and workshops to promote positive self-perception in adolescent girls

Play associated audio

Adolescent self-esteem can be affected by several factors, including body image, puberty, family life and interactions with peers. One local organization is dedicated to boosting self-esteem of adolescent girls through education and mentorship.

Miss Believe, Inc. is a nonprofit organization working to promote a positive self-perception in girls ages 10-18. By providing interactive courses and programs for young girls, Miss Believe encourages active participation and learning of the importance and value of self-understanding. Miss Believe, Inc.’s “Striving and Succeeding” (S.A.S) program is a five-session series designed to help young women define self-perception and explore how media and culture construct standards. The organization also offers “Believe University.” Program participants attend monthly meetings to explore concepts of self-confidence, self-image, nutrition, etiquette, and peer pressure. Each girl is assigned a mentor that serves as a resource for support and guidance.

For more information, contact:
Miss Believe, Inc.
301.323.8470
contact@missbelieve.org

NPR

On Television, More Transgender Characters Come Into Focus

Now that it's more common to see gay characters on TV, is the medium turning to transgender people for fresh stories? NPR's Neda Ulaby looks at TV's crop of transgender and "gender fluid" characters.
NPR

Obama Gets A Taste Of Jiro's 'Dream' Sushi In Name Of Diplomacy

On the first leg of his Asian tour, the president stopped by the iconic sushi restaurant. David Gelb, who directed a documentary about the restaurant, says eating there is amazing and nerve-wracking.
NPR

Pennsylvania Congresswoman Goes All In For Obamacare

Does Rep. Allyson Schwartz's pro-Affordable Care Act television ad signal a new thinking among Democrats running in statewide races?
NPR

FCC To Propose Change To Net Neutrality Rules, Media Report

The FCC is expected to put out new Internet traffic rules that would let content providers negotiate for better service. NPR's Melissa Block talks with Wall Street Journal reporter Gautham Nagesh.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.