A walk in memory of the victims of Sept. 11 attacks | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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A walk in memory of the victims of Sept. 11 attacks

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Described as a cross between a Gandhi-style walk and open house tour, the 9/11 Unity Walk brings thousands of people representing hundreds of organizations, religious groups and diplomatic communities together to walk in "unity," building bridges of understanding and respect. Walkers visit a dozen faiths and listen to moving speeches from international figures like Reverend Mpho Tutu and Arun Gandhi and engage in thought-provoking dialogue with one another. Walkers are encouraged to seek out and strike up conversations with people of different faiths, reflect, and also celebrate. The event includes Muslim call to prayers at the Washington Hebrew Congregation, Evangelicals and gospel singers at the Islamic Center of Washington and people of all faiths volunteering for service projects as one.

For more information, contact:
9/11 Unity Walk
3716 Massachusetts Avenue NW
Washington, D.C. 20016
202.262.2181
kyle@911unitywalk.org

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