WAMU 88.5 : Community

Filed Under:

Breaking down barriers to homeownership for low-income families

Play associated audio

Mi Casa creates affordable housing in D.C. by renovating deteriorating properties and building new homes throughout the city, and then selling them at affordable prices to low and moderate-income individuals and families. Mi Casa helps tenants organize to purchase buildings that landlords wish to sell, and then provides the new tenant and owners with education on housing development and cooperative homeownership issues along with training in finances, management and leadership. All Mi Casa clients earn less than 80 percent of the Area Median Income (more than three quarters of clients earn less than 50 or 30 percent AMI), while 95 percent are African American, Latino, and recent immigrants from Africa, the Caribbean and Latin America. For more than two decades, Mi Casa has provided quality affordable homeownership opportunities to more than 1,000 people in the Washington, D.C., area.

For more information, contact:
Mi Casa, Inc.
6230 3rd Street, NW
Suite 2
Washington, DC 20011
202.722.7423
micasa@micasa-inc.org

NPR

Collards And Canoodling: How Helen Gurley Brown Promoted Premarital Cooking

The legendary Cosmo editor, subject of two new biographies, knew sex sells – and food brings in ad money. She cannily combined them with features like "After Bed, What? (a light snack for an encore)."
NPR

Collards And Canoodling: How Helen Gurley Brown Promoted Premarital Cooking

The legendary Cosmo editor, subject of two new biographies, knew sex sells – and food brings in ad money. She cannily combined them with features like "After Bed, What? (a light snack for an encore)."
WAMU 88.5

The Legality Of Restoring Virginia Voting Rights

Virginia's governor is bypassing the commonwealth's Supreme Court ruling and restoring felon voting rights individually. Kojo examines Terry McAuliffe's move with a legal expert.

NPR

Sun-Powered Airplane Completes Historic Trip Around The World

"This is not only a first in the history of aviation; it's before all a first in the history of energy," Swiss pilot Bertrand Piccard says. His plane flew more than 26,700 miles without using fuel.