WAMU 88.5 : Community

Filed Under:

Breaking down barriers to homeownership for low-income families

Play associated audio

Mi Casa creates affordable housing in D.C. by renovating deteriorating properties and building new homes throughout the city, and then selling them at affordable prices to low and moderate-income individuals and families. Mi Casa helps tenants organize to purchase buildings that landlords wish to sell, and then provides the new tenant and owners with education on housing development and cooperative homeownership issues along with training in finances, management and leadership. All Mi Casa clients earn less than 80 percent of the Area Median Income (more than three quarters of clients earn less than 50 or 30 percent AMI), while 95 percent are African American, Latino, and recent immigrants from Africa, the Caribbean and Latin America. For more than two decades, Mi Casa has provided quality affordable homeownership opportunities to more than 1,000 people in the Washington, D.C., area.

For more information, contact:
Mi Casa, Inc.
6230 3rd Street, NW
Suite 2
Washington, DC 20011
202.722.7423
micasa@micasa-inc.org

NPR

Cult Survivor Documents 2 Decades Inside 'Holy Hell'

Will Allen directed the documentary Holy Hell, which depicts his experience as a videographer and member of The Buddhafield cult. Allen used his own footage, as well as his interviews with other former members, to make this documentary.
NPR

Evaporated Cane Juice? Puh-leeze. Just Call It Sugar, FDA Says

Companies cultivating a healthful image often list "evaporated cane juice" in their products' ingredients. But the FDA says it's really just sugar, and that's what food labels should call it.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour - May 27, 2016

Congress votes to override DC's 2013 ballot initiative on budget autonomy. Virginia governor faces a federal investigation over international finance and lobbying rules. And DC, Maryland and Virginia move to create a Metro safety oversight panel.

NPR

After Departure Of Uber, Lyft In Austin, New Companies Enter The Void

Earlier this month, voters in Austin, Texas, rejected an effort to overturn the city's rules for ride-hailing companies. Uber and Lyft tried to prevent fingerprinting of their drivers, and now both have left town. A few other ride-share companies have popped up to help fill the void. NPR explores how people are getting around town without Uber and Lyft.