Rebuilding lives and homes with reclaimed materials, green jobs training | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : Community

Filed Under:

Rebuilding lives and homes with reclaimed materials, green jobs training

Play associated audio

The Recycled Building Network is a nonprofit organization that receives and sells reclaimed building material donations in order to provide funds to train unemployed and underemployed unskilled workers for "green collar" jobs and to educate the community about sustainability. The "Rebuild Warehouse" provides an option for builders and homeowners to donate unwanted building materials, equipment, and supplies, rather than discard these into a landfill. The organization then provides the material to homeowners, small-scale landlords, builders, renovators, and property managers, enabling them to build or renovate structures that might otherwise be too costly to do so. The proceeds from the sale of these materials helps to provide unskilled workers with training and experience in "green collar" positions, allowing them to obtain necessary trade certifications, licenses, and continuing education credits.

For more information, contact:
The Recycled Building Network
6625-B Iron Place
Springfield, VA 22151-4307
703.658.8840
info@rebuildwarehouse.org

NPR

Ruth Rendell Dies, Pioneered The Psychological Thriller

British mystery writer Ruth Rendell has died; she was known for her Inspector Wexford series and in her later years became active in Labour Party politics. NPR's Petra Mayer has this remembrance.
NPR

Sandwich Monday: We're Full

The Sandwich Monday team says "See you later." Then we say, "Are you gonna eat that?"
NPR

Persian Gulf System Prohibits Nepali Migrant Workers From Returning Home

NPR's Robert Siegel talks to Tim Noonan of the International Trade Union Confederation about the call for Saudi Arabia, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates to suspend the kafala sponsorship system.
NPR

People's Republic Of Uber: Driving For Connections In China

Uber is becoming more popular in China, but many drivers say they don't do it for the money. They say they like the human connection and the freedom.