Rebuilding lives and homes with reclaimed materials, green jobs training | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Rebuilding lives and homes with reclaimed materials, green jobs training

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The Recycled Building Network is a nonprofit organization that receives and sells reclaimed building material donations in order to provide funds to train unemployed and underemployed unskilled workers for "green collar" jobs and to educate the community about sustainability. The "Rebuild Warehouse" provides an option for builders and homeowners to donate unwanted building materials, equipment, and supplies, rather than discard these into a landfill. The organization then provides the material to homeowners, small-scale landlords, builders, renovators, and property managers, enabling them to build or renovate structures that might otherwise be too costly to do so. The proceeds from the sale of these materials helps to provide unskilled workers with training and experience in "green collar" positions, allowing them to obtain necessary trade certifications, licenses, and continuing education credits.

For more information, contact:
The Recycled Building Network
6625-B Iron Place
Springfield, VA 22151-4307
703.658.8840
info@rebuildwarehouse.org

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