Kavitha Cardoza | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 Contributors

Kavitha Cardoza

Special Correspondent

Cardoza reports on area news, with a special focus on children, education and poverty.

Cardoza has won numerous awards for her work. In 2012 she received the regional Edward R. Murrow Award for Hard News. That same year, her five-part series on childhood obesity won first place in the Series category in the National Awards for Education Reporting and recognition from the Chesapeake Associated Press Broadcasters Association.

Cardoza joined the station in 2008, and was previously the Springfield bureau chief for WUIS in Illinois. She was also an adjunct faculty member for the university’s Department of Communication.

She holds graduate degrees from the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign and the Manipal Institute of Communication in India.


Articles Written by Kavitha Cardoza

WAMU 88.5
It's spring break right now at many local colleges and universities, but there's a lot happening in the world of higher education -- from budget crunches to an upcoming Supreme Court decision on affirmative action in admissions policies. WAMU 88.5's Kavitha Cardoza speaks with Scott Jaschik, editor of Inside Higher Education, about the big changes coming for colleges, and how they're ...
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A few weeks after D.C. Public Schools Chancellor Kaya Henderson announced she would close down 15 schools, she says she has a plan to keep students in the traditional school system. Henderson says she will "aggressively" recruit students from the school...
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Every year, thousands of D.C. children take part in some type of summer program, whether it’s through summer school, summer jobs or summer camps. Maggie Riden, the executive director of the D.C. Alliance of Youth Advocates, which represents 130 nonprofits that work with children, says figuring out exactly how many were taking part was difficult to determine. “No a...
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D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray announced he will ask for an increase in city funding for public education for the next fiscal year. Gray wants to increase the amount the city spends on each child's education by 2 percent. The increase means a bump up from approximately $9,100 to $9,300 for each student. Both traditional and charter schools receive a base amount of money...
WAMU 88.5
Wilson High school in Northwest D.C. is trying to educate high school students about being healthy with a little help the television personality Dr Oz at a health fair titled "Love Your Healthy Self." Students passed through the 15 different stalls on different health-related subjects. At the "I love my teeth" booth, they saw their favorite drinks matched with packets of th...
WAMU 88.5
The majority of public charter schools in D.C. will now have common deadlines for applications, school lottery and for acceptance. Eighty five of the 100 charter schools in the District have agreed on uniform dates: March 15 for applications, March 22 for lotteries and April 12 to accept a school spot. Charter schools that have more applicants than spaces hold lotteries. ...
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Thousands of students in D.C.'s traditional and charter public schools have moved out of the system during the past academic year, according to data from the first student mobility report conducted in the District. More than 6,200 students transferred out of D.C. schools — no one is sure where they've gone. Approximately 4,600 students transferred into the District. No one i...
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Charter schools in the District now educate 43 percent of the student population and their enrollment growth is dwarfing that of the city's traditional public schools, according to the latest figures. Student enrollment throughout the city's public schools increased 5 percent for this academic year. A total of 80,230 students are enrolled in D...
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Race to the Top is the $4 billion federal grant initiative to improve education. But of the twelve jurisdictions the received funds two local ones — D.C. and Maryland — are not making the progress they promised they would. Each jurisdiction laid out its own plan for comprehensive reform and nine of the 12 are making remarkable progress, federal education officials say....
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A 2008 report from the National Science Foundation showed approximately one in 10 people who work in science and engineering are managers. And of those managers, fewer than 20 percent are women. Further, female doctoral science and engineering faculty are less likely than their male colleagues to be married and have children living with them. The same report showed unmarried ...
WAMU 88.5
Crowds line the streets of Pennsylvania Avenue, as they try to land plum positions for this afternoon's inaugural parade. The parade follows the President and Vice President towards the White House starting at 2:30 p.m. this afternoon. The inaugural parade is expected to be a wonderful spectacle, with eight official floats and as many as 60 groups perfuming, including marching...
WAMU 88.5
D.C. Public Schools Chancellor Kaya Henderson has decided to close 15 schools instead of the 20 she originally proposed shuttering last year. Henderson said she changed her mind about shutting down some schools after a series of community meetings.Garrison Elementary School will remain open because of updated demographic data showing a projected increase in school-age chil...
WAMU 88.5
School districts across the country have been cutting back on physical education for years. But in the District, school leaders are revamping and fine-tuning phys ed. Games like dodgeball are out, and kids will now compete against their own individualized fitness goals — rather than each other. Kavitha Cardoza takes us inside the changes and discusses why a school system so focused on...
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Almost 3 percent of D.C. residents — about 14,000 people — are living with HIV. And among those infected, perhaps none are as vulnerable as children and adolescents. As they come to terms with a challenging medical regimen, they also quickly realize the stigma attached to HIV. Kavitha Cardoza talks with two young people about living with the disease. ...
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Two health advocacy groups gave Virginia high marks in public health emergency preparedness, according to a new report by the groups. The Trust for America's Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation say in the report that Virginia was among 10 states that meet seven of 10 key benchmarks of public health preparedness. No state met all 10 benchmarks. The scores refl...
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A Georgetown University professor has launched an online fundraising effort to help a graduate student whose mother was killed in the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn. Mary Sherlach was a psychologist at the school. Newtown superintendent Janet Robinson says Sherlach was killed when she ran toward the shooter who ultimately killed 26 people, inclu...
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It's been more than a year since WAMU 88.5 met Rachel and her family. She's now taller, in the third grade and much more talkative! Her favorite sport is soccer. "It's really fun," says Rachel. "You get to move around a lot and sometimes you get to be with your friends." In December 2010, the Freedman family — Rachel, her brother Stephen and her parents Lois and Bob -- had b...
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The District and Maryland have joined more than 40 states in embracing what's known as the "Common Core Standards." It's an effort to establish uniform expectations for what students should learn every year, from kindergarten through high school. D.C. Public Schools rolled out new reading standards last year. This year, students are learning how to do math differently. The Com...
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Parents in Montgomery County want their high schools to start at least an hour later than they do now. High schools currently start at 7:20 a.m., and 16-year-old Garret Mader says this means waking up at 5:45 a.m. and semi-sleep walking to the bus stop. And he's not the only one who's sleepy. "My friends are all tired," Mader says. "They're all really tired, and they'r...
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For years, many parents of children in D.C. Public Schools have felt unwelcome. Interaction with parents was almost always one-way: teachers telling parents what they should know. Often the meetings were about bake sales, report cards or discipline. But multiple research studies have found benefits of family engagement on a child's academic performance, resulting in highe...