Jacob Fenston | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 Contributors

Jacob Fenston

Senior News Editor for Special Projects

Fenston is WAMU's Senior News Editor for Special Projects. He came to the station after a year in the Show Me State, covering issues of health, wealth and poverty in rural Missouri. He also worked as a freelance public radio reporter in D.C., and in a previous life was a stage manager for a theater company in Portland, Oregon. While in Oregon, Fenston started producing radio as a volunteer at community radio station KBOO. He is a native of California, and has a masters in journalism from U.C. Berkeley.


Articles Written by Jacob Fenston

WAMU 88.5
Members of the Maryland General Assembly head back to Annapolis next week for the start of the 2014 session. Delegates and senators from Montgomery County say boosting the state minimum wage will be one of their top priorities. On January 1, new higher minimum wages went into effect in 13 states across the country — but Maryland was not one of them. Despite being one of the...
WAMU 88.5
The crime rate in Prince George's County continued its downward trend in 2013, according to new numbers released today. The county saw fewer homicides than any year since 1986. State and local officials crowded into the sparkling Wegman's mega-grocery store in Prince George's County to announce the latest crime statistics, with rows of cash registers for a backdrop. County Exe...
WAMU 88.5
Ann Hargrove moved to D.C.'s Adams Morgan in the 1960s, and fell in love with its historic row houses and eclectic businesses. But she soon discovered there was a plan in the works that would pave over some of the city's oldest and most vibrant neighborhoods — creating a network of freeways and along with them, urban renewal. The issue made Hargrove into an activist, and she's been...
WAMU 88.5
During the early 2000s, there was a wave of American parents adopting from China. More than 60,000 Chinese babies, mostly girls,  joined American families during that decade. Now, as those babies grow into pre-teens and teenagers, many are returning to China with their adoptive families, to learn about the country and culture in which they were born. Metro Connection...
WAMU 88.5
Ambulances and helicopters bring more than 8,000 severely injured patients to the Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore each year. The center was the first of its kind when it opened more than fifty years ago, and it's thought to be among the best in the nation. But staff are still winging it every day, making quick life-or-death decisions based on limited information about each patient. W...
WAMU 88.5
One year after the school massacre in Newtown, Conn., hundreds gathered at the Washington National Cathedral to remember the 26 victims who were killed on December 14 of last year. And despite failed attempts to tighten gun laws in Congress, advocates say the fight is not over. Families of victims, and victims themselves crowded the front of the National Cathedral. "M...
WAMU 88.5
Since June, 7-year-old Nico Loza has not been able to do the things he loves most: be outside and play soccer. Instead, Nico has been at MedStar National Rehabilitation Hospital in D.C., re-learning how to do everything from talking, to eating, to walking, after suffering a severe brain injury. ...
WAMU 88.5
For more than a decade, young undocumented immigrants have been lobbying Congress to pass the DREAM act, which would provide a path to citizenship for students who grew up in the United States. It has failed every time it's been introduced. But now, those young activists are being credited with changing the debate, and renewing national attention on immigration reform. Jacob Fenston ...
WAMU 88.5
As the nation geared up for war in the 1940's, Joseph Hairston decided to enlist. But when a recruiter told him there wasn't room in any Negro unit of a then-segregated Army, Hairston decided not to take no for an answer. Now, seven decades later, Hairston talks with Jacob Fenston about how he ultimately became the first black Army helicopter pilot and the first African-American home...
WAMU 88.5
On the edge of Virginia's Shenandoah National Park, volunteers are reconstructing a 135-year-old log cabin, originally built 100 miles north in the rolling farmland near Hancock, Md. The cabin had been uninhabited — except by raccoons — for at least a decade, and the owner was considering tearing it down. But soon, it will be open to hikers, at the foot of Old Rag Mounta...
WAMU 88.5
.mainpic { display: none; } .caption { display: none; } .photosource { display: none; } For a few days in 1968, Shaw looked like a war zone. It was the first weekend of April, and the nation's capital was burning, with mo...
WAMU 88.5
As 30,000 runners filled the streets of D.C. and Arlington today for the Marine Corps Marathon, one local group of runners raced to honor victims of the Navy Yard shooting. Runner Adam Rehman works as a budget analyst at the Navy Yard. He works across the street from building 197 — the building, where on September 16, the Navy Yard shooter took 12 lives. "My mom ...
WAMU 88.5
Around 8,000 people walked through downtown D.C. to raise money for HIV and AIDS causes this morning. The Gay Men's Chorus of Washington welcomed runners and walkers, including several D.C. Council members and Rep. Eleanor Holmes Norton. "We know that the virus is still alive, but it is not well," says Norton. Over the past four years, the number of new cases of HI...
WAMU 88.5
.mainpic { display: none; } .caption { display: none; } .photosource { display: none; } Driving around D.C. with Lloyd Wolf, there are ghosts everywhere — in the alleys behind garden apartments, next to chain-link ...
WAMU 88.5
For many in the Washington area, getting fit means unrolling a yoga mat. But the geography of yoga is limited: While studios abound in upper-middle class and gentrifying neighborhoods, there are currently no yoga studios in D.C. east of the Anacostia River. But as Jacob Fenston discovers, that could soon change, as local yogis seek to diversify the sometimes exclusive practice....
WAMU 88.5
Hundreds of conservative activists and military veterans broke down barricades at the World War II Memorial this morning, protesting the ongoing government shutdown. Veterans have been engaging in civil disobedience since the beginning of the shutdown, crossing barricades the National Park Service put up to block the memorials. It's become a cause célèbre among c...
WAMU 88.5
While inside the Capitol on Saturday, hope fizzled that a resolution to the shutdown could be in sight, outside, Tea Party activists rallied, promising to "clean up D.C." The crowd outside the Capitol came armed with trash bags and yard tools, led by conservative talk show host Glenn Beck. Beck urged Tea Party lawmakers inside to not back down. No government? No p...
WAMU 88.5
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid seems to have a new favorite word in recent weeks: "Anarchists." "We have a situation where we have a good day for the anarchists," Reid said to his Senate colleagues on the first day of the shutdown. "Why? Because the government is closed." He uses the word "anarchists" as a disparaging term for the Tea Party Republicans he blames fo...
WAMU 88.5
Marianne Buckley is a flight instructor who specializes in a type of flight not a lot of people have the stomach for — or the skills. She's an aerobatics pilot, and one of just a few women in the country who can claim that title. "Actually it's not dangerous if you know what you're doing," says Buckley. "You have to go up with someone who actually knows what he or she is doi...
NPR
One of the strictest gun laws in the nation went into effect in Maryland on Tuesday. The new law bans assault rifles and high-capacity magazines, and it makes Maryland one of only six states that require handgun purchasers to get fingerprinted and take gun safety courses. Gun owners in the state aren't happy, and in recent weeks, they've been fl...