WAMU 88.5 : About

Directions to WAMU 88.5

Our studios are located at:
4401 Connecticut Ave, NW,
Washington, DC 20008

Via Metro: Take the Red Line and get off at the Van Ness/UDC Metro station. Use the east exit and walk one block north on Connecticut Ave. to Windom Place and arrive at 4401 Connecticut Ave.

From downtown:Take Connecticut Ave. north until the 4400 block. It's the first building on the right after you pass Windom Pl. NW.

From Maryland: From the Beltway, take exit 33 for MD-185/Connecticut Ave toward Chevy Chase. Keep left at the fork, following signs for Maryland 185 S. Turn left onto MD-185 S/Connecticut Ave. At the Chevy Chase traffic circle, continue straight onto Connecticut Ave. NW. Continue south on Connecticut Ave. for 1.7 miles. The building will be on the left.

From Virginia: From 395 North, take exit 8B for Virginia 27/Washington Blvd. towards Rosslyn. Merge onto Washington Blvd. Take Arlington Memorial Bridge into the District of Columbia, then take the right ramp toward Rock Creek Parkway. Continue for 2.8 miles, then take a slight left onto Rock Creek Parkway NW/Shoreham Dr. NW. Turn left onto Connecticut Ave. NW and travel north for 1.6 miles. The building will be on the right.

Parking: There is metered street parking near the building, and there is a parking garage under Giant Foods at nearby 4303 Connecticut Ave. NW. Participating guests of WAMU programs should inquire with the show's producer about parking permits.

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